sustainability MATTERS targets learning in Biology 20 Unit A: Energy and Matter Exchange in the Biosphere and Unit B: Ecosystems and Population Change.

Find student learning sources and competency-based activities by scrolling down to the sustainability MATTERS topic banner on the LEARN webpage. This topic can be implemented through a project-based approach or by implementing the learning sources in each carousel slide as one-to-two class activities. The specific learning outcomes listed below are supported in sustainability MATTERS. Find a correlation of relevant outcomes to each activity in the Project and Activity Guide.

 

CONCEPTUAL KNOWLEDGE

Unit A: Energy and Matter Exchange in the Biosphere

20–A1.1k Explain, in general terms, the one-way flow of energy through the biosphere and how stored energy in the biosphere, as a system, is eventually “lost” as heat; e.g.,

  • Photosynthesis/chemosynthesis
  • Cellular respiration (muscle-heat generation, decomposition)

20–A1.3k Explain the structure of ecosystem trophic levels, using models such as food chains and food webs

20–A1.4k Explain, quantitatively, the flow of energy and the exchange of matter in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, using models such as pyramids of numbers, biomass and energy

20–A1.1sts Explain that the process of scientific investigation includes analyzing evidence and providing explanations based upon scientific theories and concepts (NS5f) [ICT C6–4.2]

  • Explain, in terms of energy flow, the advantage of vegetarianism in densely populated countries

20–A2.1k Explain and summarize the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and phosphorus and relate this to general reuse of all matter in the biosphere

20–A2.1sts Explain that science and technology have both intended and unintended consequences for humans and the environment (SEC3) [ICT F3–4.1]

  • Discuss the influence of human activities on the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus, sulfur, iron and nitrogen: − feedlot operations − composting − fertilizer applications − waste and sewage disposal   − acid deposition − persistent organic pollutants
  • Discuss the use of water by society, the impact such use has on water quality and quantity in ecosystems, and the need for water purification and conservation: − manufacturing and processing − agricultural system − domestic daily water consumption

20–A3.2sts Explain that science and technology have both intended and unintended consequences for humans and the environment (SEC3) [ICT F3–4.1]

  • Describe how human activities can have a disrupting influence on the balance in the biosphere of photosynthetic and cellular respiratory activities: − fossil fuel combustion − depletion of stratospheric ozone − forest destruction

 

PROCEDURAL KNOWLEDGE

Unit A: Energy and Matter Exchange in the Biosphere

20–A1.2s Conduct investigations into relationships among observable variables and use a broad range of tools and techniques to gather and record data and information

  • Draw, by hand or using technology, annotated diagrams of food chains, food webs and ecological pyramids (PR–NS4)

20–A2.1s Formulate questions about observed relationships and plan investigations of questions, ideas, problems and issues

  • Design an experiment to compare the carbon dioxide production of plants with that of animals (IP–NS1, IP–NS2, IP–NS3, IP–NS4)
  • Predict disruptions in the nitrogen and phosphorus cycles that are caused by human activities (IP–NS3) [ICT C6–4.1]

20–A2.4s Work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results

  • Work cooperatively in a group to investigate the influence of human activities on the biogeochemical cycles and use appropriate multimedia to present the information to a group (CT–SEC1, CT–SEC2, CT–SEC3) [ICT C1–4.2, F2–4.7, P3–4.1]

20–A3.4s Work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results

  • Work cooperatively as a group to investigate, synthesize and present information on the effects of changes to stratospheric ozone levels on society, agriculture, plants and animals (CT–SEC1, CT–SEC2, CT–SEC3) [ICT C1–4.4, C7–4.2, F2–4.7]

 

CONCEPTUAL KNOWLEDGE

Unit B: Ecosystems and Population Change

20–B1.1k Define species, population, community and ecosystem and explain the interrelationships among them

20–B1.3k Identify biotic and abiotic characteristics and explain their influence in an aquatic and a terrestrial ecosystem in the local region; e.g., stream, lake, prairie, boreal forest, vacant lot, sports field

20–B1.4k Explain how limiting factors influence organism distribution and range; e.g.,

  • Abiotic factors: soil, relative humidity, moisture, ambient temperature, sunlight, nutrients, oxygen
  • Biotic factors: competitors, predators and parasites

20–B1.1sts Explain how science and technology have both intended and unintended consequences for humans and the environment (SEC3) [ICT F3–4.1]

  • Evaluate the impact that human activity has had, or could have, on the biodiversity in an ecosystem: – wetlands management – land use – interbasin water transfer – habitat fragmentation – urbanization – slash-and-burn and clearcutting practices – monoculturing of forests, lawns, field crops

 

PROCEDURAL KNOWLEDGE

Unit B: Ecosystems and Population Change

20–B1.1s Formulate questions about observed relationships; plan investigations of questions, ideas, problems and issues; and define and delimit problems to facilitate investigation

  • Hypothesize the role of biotic and abiotic factors in ecosystems; e.g., competition and chinooks (IP–NS3) [ICT C6–4.1]

20–B1.3s Analyze data and apply mathematical and conceptual models to develop and assess possible solutions

  • Analyze the interrelationship of biotic and abiotic characteristics that make up the ecosystem studied (AI–NS2, AI–NS3, AI–NS6)

20–B1.4s Work collaboratively in addressing problems and apply the skills and conventions of science in communicating information and ideas and in assessing results

  • Work cooperatively to make clear and logical arguments to defend a decision on a given issue, such as human impact on ecosystems, land reclamation or wildlife habitat preservation (CT–SEC1, CT–SEC2, CT–SEC3) [ICT C1–4.4]
  • Develop, present and defend a strategy to improve wildlife habitats (CT–SEC3) [ICT C1–4.4]

 

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