How are people, the land and agriculture interdependent?

How can you find out where a food product comes from?

PICK ONE OF THE ANSWERS BELOW, THEN SCROLL DOWN TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT CONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE LAND AND FARMING 

Read and discuss FARM AND LAND CONNECTIONS to find out more about the types of farms that can be found in Canada’s natural regions.

Read and discuss FINDING FARMS to explore how the location of farms across Canada can be influenced by the land and resources.

 

 

Read and discuss CITIES AND FARMS to find out why farming is affected by where people in Canada live.

Complete the activities in USE GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION TO MAKE CONNECTIONS.

 

finding agricultural products

Products we use every day come from the natural resources found across Canada’s regions. These natural resources include the air, sunlight, water, the land, plant and animal life and minerals. Natural resources are used to obtain goods and provide services.

Many of the food products we use every day come from Canada’s natural resources.

Farmers raise livestock and grow plants on different types of farms. Some of Canada’s farms grow fruit and vegetables, some raise cattle for meat or dairy products, some raise chickens for meat or eggs and others grow grains like wheat, canola, barley, oats and pulses. Some farms combine raising livestock and growing grains.

On these farms, hundreds of different products and commodities.

What do you know about the agricultural products that are produced in your region?

 

 

Infographic used with permission from Agriculture More Than Ever. www.agriculturemorethanever.ca/resources/

 

food variety

You can find many of the food products made by Canada’s farmers in every region. For example, blueberries grown in British Columbia can be found in grocery stores in Toronto. Apples grown in the Atlantic region are found in Alberta grocery stores and markets. Milk produced in Alberta is made into cheese that can be sold around the world.

Canada’s regions have different types of climate. Because of this, Canadian farmers across the country can grow and raise everything from bison, bees, and goats, to potatoes, grapes, greenhouse vegetables and even hazelnuts.

Canada is the fifth largest exporter of agriculture products in the world. Canada makes about 80 percent of the world’s pure maple syrup and the most maple products. Canada is also the world’s largest grower and exporter of flax seed, canola, pulses, mustard and durum wheat.

From Farm and Food Care: Real Dirt on Farming (2017). www.realdirtonfarming.ca/assets/docs/PDFs/2017-dirt-eng.pdf